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BallyAlley_r2_c1.gif BallyAlley_r2_c2.gif Astrocade Video Art BallyAlley_r2_c4.gif
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4D2.
By Rusty Blommaert and Dale Smith (R&L Enterprises).
ARCADIAN 4, no. 1 (November 10, 1981): 5,8.
4D2 video created by Adam Trionfo.
Video published August 7, 2017.

4D2 is a Bally Arcade/Astrocade program written in Bally BASIC and machine language. It is a video art program that creates four color panels. As the program runs it displays short messages and plays sound effects. The two programmers concealed the messages so that they would be a surprise to anyone who typed the program into BASIC and RAN it.

4D2 was the Arcadian $100 contest winner for the November 1981 issue of the newsletter.


The 4D2 video can also be watched and/or downloaded from the Internet Archive:
  1. 4D2, by Rusty Blommaert and Dale Smith (archive.org)

Arcadian Logo.
By Guy McLimore.
Arcadian 2, no. 1 (Nov. 29, 1979): 3.
Arcadian Logo video created by Adam Trionfo.
Video published August 16, 2018.

This video art program is written in Bally BASIC.

Here are is a brief overview of this program from the Arcadian: "Logo shown at the head of page one is based on an idea by Guy McLimore, and embellished by myself. If you'd like to see it in action (literally) and in living color, the program is included."

The Arcadian Logo video can also be watched and/or downloaded from the Internet Archive:
  1. Arcadian Logo by Guy McLimore (archive.org)

Chicago Loop.
By Mike Peace.
Cursor 1, no. 3 (March 1980): 21.
Chicago Loop video created by Adam Trionfo.
Video published September 14, 2018.

Chicago Loop appeared first as a Bally BASIC program in the Cursor newsletter in March 1980 on page 21. This program was slightly revised and re-printed in 1981 for "AstroBASIC" in the on page 88 of the "AstroBASIC" Manual. This program incorporates the use of three loops to provide a unique display of graphics looking very much like a city on a lake, complete with reflections, traffic and sound effects.

The Chicago Loop video can also be watched and/or downloaded from the Internet Archive:
  1. Chicago Loop by Mike Peace (archive.org)

Design.
By Mark Ream.
Cursor 2, no. 2 (September 1980): 60.
Design video created by Adam Trionfo.
Video published October 3, 2018.

This Bally BASIC video art program will also run without modification in "AstroBASIC." This is a video overview of the original version of the Design art program and two suggested modifications that change the art that the program creates.

Fred Cornett, the editor of Cursor wrote, "This delightful little program puts up some very nice designs. When "PRESS DESIRED CHARACTER" is printed on-screen, select the character you would like to see as the central theme of the design and merely press that key. We have added a couple modifications to the program that make some interesting changes. Press "GO" for new character." [...] "The above program as-stands, does a horizontal sweep which changes the characters, add line 80, which will add a vertical sweep." [...] "Make the following line changes to automatically run through all the special characters that are available on the Bally, one character at a time, pausing for a few seconds in between displays."

The Design video can also be watched and/or downloaded from the Internet Archive:
  1. Design by Mark Ream (archive.org)

Electronic Visualization Center Overview
with Bally Arcade Video Art Background.
By Dan Sandin and Phil Morton.
Arcadian 2, no. 3 (Jan. 15, 1980): 20.
video created by Adam Trionfo.
Video published November 13, 2018.

Electronic Visualization Center, by Dan Sandin and Phil Morton, was published in the January 1980 issue of the Arcadian newsletter for the Bally Arcade/Astrocade. This program was written for Bally BASIC, but also runs without any changes for "AstroBASIC."

Only the last few minutes of this video is dedicated to the Electronic Visualization Center BASIC overview. The majority of this video contains a general history of video art and how it relates to the Bally Arcade.

This is the description for the program from the Arcadian:

"Enlarged letters have cropped up again. This time they are done graphically, as opposed to previous POKE'd versions. In the program, I used BIG LETTERS for the items to be printed where Phil used ARCADIAN HOT SHOT. Lines 129-240 clean up the screen and add the buckshot. Phil has an AXIOM EX-850 video printer which can 'photograph' the screen and provide a reproducible image. Co-Author Phil Morton will be vanning to Alaska this summer and would like to contact Northerners."

Electronic Visualization Center contains about twenty lines of executable BASIC code. This program is run five times and each run is slightly different. Sometimes the text displayed is different, and sometimes the size is different.

The Electronic Visualization Center Overview with Bally Arcade Video Art Background video can also be watched and/or downloaded from the Internet Archive:
  1. Electronic Visualization Center Overview (archive.org)

Halloween Ghost.
By James Wilkinson.
Arcadian 2, no. 10 (Sep. 17, 1980): 103-104.
Video created by Adam Trionfo.
Video published October 31, 2018.

From the ARCADIAN newsletter:

HALLOWEEN GHOST is a self-running program that is topical. The author sets up a TV at a window near his front door, and the program, a "talking" skull, makes snide remarks about the people going by. It re-cycles, and uses random statements on the screen, shifting colors as well.

When the program is run it says: "HORRIBLE HARRY THE INSULTING TV GHOST MYSTERIOUSLY APPEARS HERE EVERY HALLOWEEN" The nine insults that "Harry" will throw at those passing by are:
  1. WHAT IS YOUR PROBLEM?
  2. YOU LOOK TERRIBLE!!!
  3. THAT CAN'T BE -YOUR FACE
  4. YIPES!!-YOU SURE ARE UGLY
  5. YOUR WORMS ARE SHOWING
  6. WHO DUG YOU UP?
  7. HOW COME YOU HAVE 3 EYES?
  8. YOU LOOK LIKE THE -DEVIL-
  9. I'D HATE to BE YOUR MUMMY
This video was created from the modified version of the program that has NT=-1 in the BASIC listing to allow sound to work properly under "AstroBASIC." This fix was made by Lance Squire on May 6, 2006.

The Halloween Ghost video can also be watched and/or downloaded from the Internet Archive:
  1. Halloween Ghost by James Wilkinson (archive.org)

Halloween Graphics with Flying Witch Demo.
By David Ibach and Steve Walters.
Arcadian 3, no. 12 (Oct. 05, 1981): 126-127. (BASIC Listing)
Arcadian 4, no. 1 (Nov. 10, 1981): 3. (Loading Method Explanation)
General Video Assembler Package (Flying Witch Sample)
Video created by Adam Trionfo.
Video published October 31, 2018.

Halloween Graphics, written in Bally BASIC, and Flying Witch Demo, written in machine language, are two separate programs running together.

Halloween Graphics is called "BOO" in the Arcadian. It runs with "AstroBASIC" and no expansion RAM. It draws a pumpkin, a haunted house, a skull and a witch. It runs for about two minutes and then repeats. The flying witch demo requires at least 4K of expansion RAM. A witch flies around a blank screen. When these two programs are combined, as in this video, then a witch flies around a haunted house. The program runs twice in this video.

Oh, what's the deal with the pumpkin being yellow and not orange...?

The Halloween Graphics with Flying Witch Demo video can also be watched and/or downloaded from the Internet Archive:
  1. Halloween Graphics with Flying Witch Demo by David Ibach and Steve Walters (archive.org)

J-3 - 3K Art.
By Stanley Kendall.
May 28, 1984.
J-3 - 3K Art video created by Adam Trionfo.
Video published May 14, 2018.

This is a video art program written for the Bally Arcade/Astrocade in Blue Ram BASIC. It requires at least a 4K Blue Ram expansion.

This video starts off with a nine-minute narration which includes an introduction to Stanley's program. It also provides some background material on Mr. Kendall. The narration is accompanied by screenshots from 3K Art. It is followed by about an hour of video from 3K Art running random art of various different kinds. Some of the art includes use of commands such as Circle that are only available in Blue Ram BASIC. The video ends with a listing of the BASIC program and is followed by brief credits.

This program was found on a tape in Ken Lill's tape collection. This program is probably previously unpublished.

The J-3 - 3K Art video can also be watched and/or downloaded from the Internet Archive:
  1. J-3 - 3K Art by Stanley Kendall (archive.org)

Magic Jack-O-Lantern, The.
By Bill Loos (L&M Software).
1987.
Video created by Adam Trionfo.
Video published October 31, 2018.

An orange jack-o-lantern is drawn on the screen. The eyes move and some sound effects play. The program only runs for about 13 seconds and then repeats, therefore I let it run three times in this video. In this program the pumpkin is orange: hooray!

Have a happy Halloween everyone, and eat some dark chocolate for me!

The Magic Jack-O-Lantern video can also be watched and/or downloaded from the Internet Archive:
  1. The Magic Jack-O-Lantern by Bill Loos (archive.org)

Perspective Box.
By Rickey Spiece.
Bally BASIC Manual, Page 115, 1978.
Video created by Adam Trionfo.
Video published November 7, 2018.

Perspective Box draws a "box" which is meant to have a pseudo 3D perspective in a corner of the screen. The program changes the color of the box and then "shrinks" it. The program is simple enough that it wasn't included in the manual for the re-release of Bally BASIC, but it probably helped early purchasers and users of the Bally Arcade go on to create video art.

Rickey Spiece worked on the original Bally Arcade back in the 1970s at Dave Nutting and Associates. According to the Bally/Astrocade Game Cartridge and Hardware FAQ, Rickey Spiece also programmed, or helped to program, numerous cartridges for the Bally Arcade, including:
  1. Black Jack/Poker/Acey-Deucey - Written by Mason and finished by Rickey Spiece
  2. Football - Written by Bob Ogden and Rickey Spiece
  3. Grand Prix/Demolition Derby - Written by Bob Ogden, Rickey Spiece, and Scot L. Norris.
  4. Panzer Attack/Red Baron - Written by Rickey Spiece.
  5. Sea Wolf/Bombardier - Written by Rickey Spiece.
The Perspective Box video can also be watched and/or downloaded from the Internet Archive:
  1. Perspective Box by Rickey Spiece (archive.org)

Remembering the Future - Live!
By Slaughter's House Live.
Video created by Jason Slaughter.
Video published March 20, 2010.

This is the live video of a segment for a performance on 3/14/10 dealing with the concept of Memory. The performance was given in New York, Colorado, Korea, and Italy simultaneously through an Internet 2 connection, with performers and audiences in all locations.

The painting seen on the screens during the performance was created by Seokshin Park in Korea. The painting represents his live reactions to the performance as it occurred.

The first part was programmed in BASIC on 2 Bally Astrocades. The music for the second part was created using a Colecovision with the CV Drum Cart, and the music for the last part was created with the SynthCart for the Atari 2600. The visuals for both the Colecovision and Atari 2600 segments were produced with an Atari Video Music. Unfortunately, the Atari Video Music was largely handicapped for the live performance due to technical limitations imposed by modern equipment!

The programs created for this production, a graphical representation of the technical setup, and other additional information can be found on my website, www.jasoncslaughter.com.


Remembering the Future (Revised)
By Slaughter's House Live.
Video created by Jason Slaughter.
Video published March 20, 2010.

This is the final version of a segment for a performance on 3/14/10 dealing with the concept of Memory. The first part was programmed in BASIC on 2 Bally Astrocades. The music for the second part was created using a Colecovision with the CV Drum Cart, and the music for the last part was created with the SynthCart for the Atari 2600. The visuals for both the Colecovision and Atari 2600 segments were produced with an Atari Video Music.

More information can be found at my website, www.jasoncslaughter.com.


Random Art
By Ernie Sams.
ARCADIAN 1, no. 6 (May. 4, 1979): 44.
Random Art video created by Adam Trionfo.
Video published November 5, 2018.

This is the first video art program published in the Arcadian. The program's description from the newsletter is quite short, "Random Art is a quick little moving box program." Note how the program isn't even referred to as video art yet. What is a "moving box program," anyway? Random Art creates a single-color, random art pattern based upon width and height increments which are input by the user.

The Random Art video can also be watched and/or downloaded from the Internet Archive:
  1. Random Art by Ernie Sams (archive.org)

Random Box
By Scott Walpole.
ARCADIAN 2, no. 2 (Dec. 22, 1979): 17..
Random Box video created by Adam Trionfo.
Video published November 8, 2018.

Random Box, by Scott Walpole, is a video art program that appeared in the December 1979 issue of the Arcadian newsletter along with three other short programs by Scott: a game called Number Match and two music programs, Hello, Dolly and Popeye the Sailor. The Arcadian has no instructions or comments for Random Box. The program simply draws random-sized boxes on the screen and the colors periodically change.

The Random Box video can also be watched and/or downloaded from the Internet Archive:
  1. Random Box by Scott Walpole (archive.org)

Ring.
By Albert Paul.
Cursor, 1, no. 4 (April/May 1980): 31.
Ring video created by Adam Trionfo.
Video published August 16, 2018.

From the Cursor newsletter: Many thanks to Albert Paul of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada for the following program. Note: to make the ring sticker or thinner, change the value of "N" (line 2). To make the ring larger or smaller, change the value of "M" (line 20). "M" must always be larger than "N."

The Ring video can also be watched and/or downloaded from the Internet Archive:
  1. Ring by Albert Paul (archive.org)

Scroll One, Scroll Two and Scroll Three.
By Larry Cuba.
Bally BASIC manual, Pages 116-117. January 1978.
"AstroBASIC" manual, Pages 83-84.
Scroll One, Two and Three video created by Adam Trionfo.
Video published November 12, 2018.

The description from the BASIC manuals says: "These three programs are like paintings. The images evolve slowly and the visual experience changes over time." To me, this summary is a great definition of video art in general.

Larry Cuba is an early computer artist. His most famous work from the 1970s is the animation of the Death Star Trench used in the 1977 film Star Wars.

Scroll One draws, line by line, boxes of random widths that eventually fill the screen. Scroll Two draws, line by line, small boxes of random widths and heights that eventually fill the screen. Scroll Three draws, line by line, small box of random widths and heights which create small patterns that eventually fill the screen.

The Scroll One, Two and Three video can also be watched and/or downloaded from the Internet Archive:
  1. Scroll One, Scroll Two and Scroll Three. by Larry Cuba. (archive.org)

Self-Portrait: A Graphics Demo.
By Guy McLimore, Jr.
April 10, 1979.
Self-Portrait: A Graphics Demo video created by Adam Trionfo.
Video published July 9, 2018.

This program was typed from a hand-written BASIC listing from an unpublished Arcadian submission that was found in the Bob Fabris Collection. This program draws a simple Bally Arcade unit.

The Self-Portrait: A Graphics Demo video can also be watched and/or downloaded from the Internet Archive:
  1. Design by Guy McLimore, Jr. (archive.org)

Spiral 1 and Spiral 2.
By Dick Ainsworth.
Bally BASIC manual. 1978.
Program video created by Adam Trionfo.
Video published October 11, 2018.

Spiral 1 and Spiral 2 are two video art programs by Dick Ainsworth, co-writer of the Bally BASIC instruction manual. These programs are written for the Bally Arcade game system, more commonly called by its 1981 re-release name of Astrocade. Both programs are included in the 1978 original Bally BASIC manual and its 1981 "AstroBASIC" re-release. The video art is created using a few program loops and LINE command statements to fill the screen with a random, semi-controlled, pattern.

Spiral 1 appears in the appendix of programs at the back of both BASIC manuals (page 103 of the Bally BASIC manual and on page 75 of the "AstroBASIC" manual). Spiral 2 is built-up from smaller BASIC pieces in Chapter 8: Video Art (pages 93-96 of the Bally BASIC manual pages 62-64 of the "AstroBASIC" manual). The chapter explains how the program works.

The eight-page Video Art chapter in the Bally BASIC manual gives users new to programming a chance to try their newly acquired skills to create art. Spiral 1 and Spiral 2, simple programs that could be easily modified, inspired many Bally Arcade users. Judging from the printed content of the two main Astrocade newsletters (Arcadian and Cursor/BASIC Express), video games and video art became the two most popular ways that amateur programmers on the Astrocade platforms used their systems. Perhaps without the video art chapter and these two simple BASIC example programs, there would not have been as much video art created on the Bally system. That would have been a shame, as the art that clever programmers created on the Astrocade platform over the next seven to eight years is quite impressive given the limited 1.8KB of RAM and 160x88 resolution of the console.
The Spiral 1 and Spiral 2 video can also be watched and/or downloaded from the Internet Archive:
  1. Spiral 1 and Spiral 2, by Dick Ainsworth (archive.org)

Spirals II.
By Matt Giwer.
Arcadian 2, no. 10 (Sep. 17, 1980): 95.
Spiral II video created by Adam Trionfo.
Video published October 5, 2018.

Spirals II is a video art program written for Bally BASIC. It also works without modification for "AstroBASIC." Spirals, the original version of this program appeared in Arcadian 2, no. 8 (Jun. 23, 1980): 69. This updated version of the program was published in Arcadian 2, no. 10 (Sep. 17, 1980): 95.

Spirals II creates randomly-sized, diamond-shaped patterns in B&W using the LINE command. Spirals II is one of six programs submitted to the Arcadian on May 29, 1980. The other five programs were Boxes (printed as Diminishing Boxes), I Ching, Life IV, Morse Code, and Spiral (printed as Spirals). Two of the six programs (I Ching and Morse Code) were never printed in the Arcadian.

The Spirals II video can also be watched and/or downloaded from the Internet Archive:
  1. Spiral II, by Matt Giwer (archive.org)

Two Boxes at Once.
By Mark McKernin.
1979.
Two Boxes at Once video created by Mark McKernin.
Video published by "evltube" December 28, 2007.

This is an example of early computer graphics animation on the Datamax UV-1, developed by students at the Electronic Visualization Lab (EVL). This animation was created by Mark McKernin. "B&W video. A computer animated piece featuring a series geographic patterns. Created on a home computer system."

The Two Boxes at Once video can also be watched from the the Media Burn archive. It is included as part of episode 44 of "Image Union," which was recorded on January 7, 1980:
  1. Image Union, #44 Produced by Dan Sandin, Ken Solarz, Mark McKernin, and Thomas Weinberg (MediaBurn.org)

Viper Test Pattern.
By Alternative Engineering.
1981.
Viper Test Pattern video created by Adam Trionfo.
Video published March 27, 2018.

For use with a RAM Expansion and an extended BASIC, such as Vipersoft BASIC or Blue Ram BASIC.

According to The BASIC Express newsletter, "The program puts up a gorgeous ever-changing complex pattern on the screen. You would swear that 32 different colors are on screen at the same time." This is a neat program that uses some of the features of extended BASIC (such as the CIRCLE command) and the additional colors that are not available without using machine language from Bally BASIC or "AstroBASIC." This video art program was released on a cassette tape with Viper 1 RAM Expansion. It also appeared in July/August 1981 BASIC Express newsletter (Vol. 3, Pages 26-27) and the December 1981 Arcadian newsletter (Vol. 4, Page 19).

The Viper Test Pattern video can also be watched and/or downloaded from the Internet Archive:
  1. Viper Test Pattern, by Alternative Engineering (archive.org)
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